Is the Canon of Scripture in the Bible?

Is the Canon of Scripture in the Bible?

Michael Lofton answers whether the Canon is the Bible. He defends the material sufficiency view of Scripture in light of the canon question and explains why sola scriptura and the partim-partim view are untenable positions to maintain.

Definitions of terms used:

Divine revelation – what God has supernaturally revealed.
Scripture – the written transmission of what God has supernaturally revealed.
Sola Scriptura – that only Scripture is an infallible rule on faith and morals. All other rules are fallible.
Sacred Tradition – that which has been handed down in writing or orally that God has supernaturally revealed.
Oral Tradition – the oral transmission of supernatural revelation.
Material Sufficiency – all supernatural revelation is either implicitly or explicitly in scripture.
Partim Partim view – some supernatural revelation is only in Scripture and some is only in oral tradition.
Inherent tradition – supernatural revelation that is explicit in the bible.
Declarative tradition – supernatural revelation that is implicit in the bible.
Constitutive tradition – the view that some of the content of supernatural revelation is not in scripture, even implicitly (part of the partim partim view).
Dominical tradition – supernatural revelation revealed by Jesus.
Divine apostolic tradition – supernatural revelation revealed by God through the Apostles.
Dogmatic tradition – supernaturally revealed doctrines (teachings).
Human Apostolic tradition – non-revelatory tradition given by the Apostles.
Ecclesiastical tradition – non-revelatory traditions that are post-apostolic and derive from the church.
Disciplinary tradition – apostolic or post-apostolic non-revelatory practices, including liturgical rites, that.
Primary object of infallibility – something that God has revealed that the church can teach infallibly.
Secondary object of infallibility – something that God has not revealed that the church can teach infallibly.



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